Gender Divisions

Women’s sport is undoubtedly on the rise, with greater exposure in the media leading to increasing professionalism across a number of sports. Despite this, there remains a huge gap to fill in terms of inequality and opportunity for female sports stars.

Gender Divisions offers an interactive way to compare and contrast the varying levels of opportunity in sport around the world. Scroll to get started…

This year has already seen some great advances in women’s sport, for example, increased coverage and broadcasts through traditional media, and big financial deals like the Barclays and FA WSL partnership. I have no doubt that the rest of 2019 is going to be incredible for women’s sport with some big events on the horizon.

However, these can detract somewhat from the true state of the industry. Whilst these findings are not entirely surprising to me, it never fails to disappoint when I see just how far we still have to go. Quantifiable change seems to only come when the athletes personally stick their necks out to defy the sexism they face when they show up to work every day, and it is only then that the industry takes notice and instils change. This is demonstrated quite clearly in tennis, where the players are now much closer to a level playing field to men in contrast to all other sports. But that was no smooth or fast journey.

My hope is that through the publication of findings such as these, other stakeholders in the industry–including fans–will start to demand better for sport. Until we do, women’s sport will always come in second to men’s.

Ro Jackson

Editor in Chief, SLOWE

Football

Did Your Know

Did You Know...

The Ballon d'Or has been awarded to the best player in the world in the men's game in various guises since 1956, but it was only in 2018 that the women's game was officially recognised. What made it worse was that the inaugral winner, Ada Hegerberg, was asked by French DJ and host Martin Solveig if she "knew how to twerk" upon receiving the award. The coverage following the incident somewhat overshadowed what should have been a memorable occasion both for the Swedish striker and for the women's game.

Highest Paid

Highest Paid

Lionel Messi

Alex Morgan

Salary & Prize Money

$84m

Annually

$83.6m

difference

$450k

Annually

Endorsements

$27m

Annually

$24.5m

difference

$2.6m

Annually

Most Followed

Most Followed

Cristiano Ronaldo

Alex Morgan

Twitter Followers

76.9m

Twitter Followers

73.3m

difference

3.6m

Twitter Followers

Competition Popularity

Competition Popularity

World Cup

47.4k

Attendees

21.3k

difference

26k

Attendees

UEFA Champions League

45.8k

Attendees

43.5k

difference

2.3k

Attendees

Premier League & Women's Super League

38k

Attendees

37.1k

difference

953

Attendees

Professional Athletes

Professional Athletes

Number of Professional Athletes

137k

Footballers

135.7k

difference

1.3k

Footballers